27 7 / 2014

joshdannin:

go print !

joshdannin:

go print !

15 6 / 2014

(Source: smokeandsong, via smokeandsong)

14 6 / 2014

hozea:

Typecase, literally. 日星鑄字行 Rixing Type Foundry #taipei #臺北 #台北 #taiwan #臺灣 #台灣 #kowcher #kowchertaipei #may2013 #GH3 #m43 #lumix #lumixlounge #rixing #type #typefoundry #letterpress

hozea:

Typecase, literally. 日星鑄字行 Rixing Type Foundry #taipei #臺北 #台北 #taiwan #臺灣 #台灣 #kowcher #kowchertaipei #may2013 #GH3 #m43 #lumix #lumixlounge #rixing #type #typefoundry #letterpress

13 6 / 2014

depressionpress:

The Handy Box | Craig Cutler’s CC52 project

depressionpress:

The Handy Box | Craig Cutler’s CC52 project

(via letterpressparade)

17 4 / 2014

stumptownprinters:

The pica pole pictured above is a piece of Portland, Oregon printing history uncovered recently by Dee of Magpie Messenger Collective. When Dee first came upon this treasure discarded in the street, he recognized it for what it was most recently used for: a "slim jim" (tool for breaking into cars) but what caught his eye was that this tool was crudely fashioned from a printer’s pica stick. It’s an old one, and has a name engraved on it in several places: “WM S LINTO”. Upon referencing old trade journals and an old phone directory that we have here at Stumptown Printers, we discovered that Linto (William) was a prolific local hot-metal era printer born in 1885. He started working in the printing trade at age 19.

On top of that, the printer’s tool was supplied to Linto from the Portland American Type Founders office, one of 4 such offices west of the Rocky Mountains during the early twentieth century (Fellow printing geeks will appreciate this - American Type Founders were the King-Daddies of type founding and design for much of the twentieth century). Linto was a compositor at the Oregonian newspaper, but is also known in the world of stamp collectors for his private press work, in particular his printing of cachets. Most of the examples that we could find were of World War II era propaganda (if you search for it, be warned: some of the stuff is a bit over-the-top and can be offensive) but we did find earlier examples of cachets commemorating local events such as the Portland Rose Festival (Pictured Above. The image was lifted from this website).

So how did this antique pica pole get into the hands of someone who is more interested in breaking into cars than typography and small press? That’s the mystery. Anyone who has worked in a print shop knows that printer’s pica sticks and line gauges are not to be messed with, once a printer claims his/her pica pole, it stays with them. Printers rely on their own, if they were to use another, they may find their measurements off by a half a point, so it’s best to stick with the tool that they are familiar with. Linto knew this: his name is engraved in 3 places on this pica stick. Undoubtedly he kept this trusty tool close to him, which aided him in creating an estimated excess of 5000 different cachets (source).

This American Type Founders pica pole is roughly 75 years old, why did it surface now? The person who was using it as a slim jim was no craftsperson, the conversion is very crude and the “rope work” making up the lanyard is bungled. So I’m guessing that the assumed thief isn’t a former printer looking for a new livelihood. But you gotta hand it to whoever appropriated this printer’s tool. It does appear to be the right size and shape for breaking into cars. Pretty clever. This use of a pica stick is something that has never occurred to us. We had better keep an eye on ours. But the real question is: How would Linto feel about his precious tool being used in this way?

Thanks to Dee for sharing this find, and for having fun researching this bit of Portland printing history with us

(via serialmachinist)

10 4 / 2014

type-lover:

Movable Type
by PanBonTon

(via letterpressparade)

10 3 / 2014

globeatmica:

Hand-carved carnival show sticks!!!

globeatmica:

Hand-carved carnival show sticks!!!

(via letterpressparade)

25 2 / 2014

printclubboston:

Studio on Fire has some sweet, sweet business cards. 

(via smokeandsong)

16 2 / 2014

huldrapress:

Amze Emmons & Marianne Dages, June, Letterpress print, 2013 SP Weather Station Reports Portfolio

huldrapress:

Amze Emmons & Marianne Dages, June, Letterpress print, 2013 SP Weather Station Reports Portfolio

07 2 / 2014

31 1 / 2014

serialmachinist:

Moveable Type | Kyle Durrie’s Mobile Letterpress Truck

(Source: vimeo.com)

17 1 / 2014

serialmachinist:

image by Duke Sr on Flickr.

serialmachinist:

image by Duke Sr on Flickr.

09 1 / 2014

joshdannin:

Fresh catchword from Virgin Wood Type. Damn!

joshdannin:

Fresh catchword from Virgin Wood Type. Damn!

(via letterpressparade)

29 12 / 2013

smokeandsong:

Happy birthday to Dorothy L. Sayers!

To celebrate, here are a few photos of a two-color letterpress print I recently finished. The type is a unique beast—it’s Casalon Buch Italic, and the letter blocks are highly unusual; they’re cut in a curved shape, and require special wedge-shaped end pieces for blocking in the lines. The type was rescued from the New York Times back when they stopped printing their headlines by hand, and it’s definitely showing the use. I had to proof a lot of pages before I could get a complete set of working letters.

The print, of course, is an excerpt from one of Peter’s letters to Harriet in Gaudy Night. The letter itself is gorgeous:

Dear Harriet,

I send in my demand notes with the brutal regularity of the income-tax commissioners; and probably you say when you see the envelopes, ‘Oh, God! I know what this is.’ The only difference is that, some time or other, one has to take notice of the income tax.

Will you marry me?—It’s beginning to look like one of those lines in a farce—merely boring till it’s said often enough; and after that, you get a bigger laugh every time it comes.

I should like to write you the kind of words that burn the paper they are written on—but words like that have a way of being not only unforgettable but unforgivable. You will burn the paper in any case; and I would rather there should be nothing in it that you cannot forget if you want to.

Well, that’s over. Don’t worry about it.

My nephew (whom you seem, by the way, to have stimulated to the most extraordinary diligence) is cheering my exile by dark hints that you are involved in some disagreeable and dangerous job of work at Oxford about which he is in honour-bound to say nothing. I hope he is mistaken. But I know that, if you have put anything in hand, disagreeableness and danger will not turn you back, and God forbid they should. Whatever it is, you have my best wishes for it.

I am not my own master at the moment, and do not know where I shall be sent next or when I shall be back—soon, I trust. In the meantime may I hope to hear from time to tune that all is well with you?

Yours, more than my own,

Peter Wimsey

29 12 / 2013